07 February 2017

A team of Business School students have already raised more than £2,500, with the launch of a charity colouring book of iconic Edinburgh locations.

The group collaborated with students from the Edinburgh College of Art to create the book, which features illustrations of landmarks including Arthur’s Seat, Holyrood Palace and University of Edinburgh’s Old College.

Edinburgh in Colour

Our students are doing an amazing job raising money for Children 1st with their new Edinburgh in Colour coloring-in book – including 12 beautiful sketches designed by Edinburgh College of Art students. Grab your copy and support a good cause: http://etsy.me/2jKXDC8

Posted by University of Edinburgh Business School on Monday, 6 February 2017

 

The project is part of Dragons Glen, a Scotland-wide challenge pioneered by charity Children 1st.

Students Rob Yates, Kritiya Piyaseth, Rasmus Udde, Karine Mkrtchyan, Robert Castek, Olivia Mason Gregory Michel, Rebecca Moog, Nitesh Agarwal, and Sophie Riddle launched Edinburgh in Colour at an event at the Business School, where copies and limited edition prints of the artwork were auctioned to raise funds for the charity.

The book retails at £7.99 and is available to purchase online and at many galleries and venues throughout the city. Buy it now.

Dragon’s Glen challenges aspiring entrepreneurs to pitch ideas that will turn an initial investment of £500 into more than £5,000 profit.

The Edinburgh students are competing with groups from EY, Scottish and Southern Energy and Thortons Solicitors to win the Dragons Glen prize, while raising money for charity along the way.

“We’re really pleased with the success of the colouring book so far, and after our launch event we are now well on the way to reaching our target of raising £5,000.”

“With continued support from fellow students, the local community, the Business School, Edinburgh College of Art and across the University, we hope the project could go further and raise even more to help Children 1st’s work with Children across Scotland.”